Korean animals are weird…

So, not surprisingly, I’m totally late to my own posting party. Are you surprised? Yeah. Me neither.

So, due to my bad habits and a ton of business happenings, I’m not going to write much to you. I’m going to show you something.

Months ago, I talked with a class of girls about how Korean animals, apparently, sound totally different than American animals. Well, at least when humans are speaking for them.

So, we wrote it down:

Korean animal sounds

Korean animal sounds

Let me translate:

Frog: “geh-guhl geh-guhl” (this is weird, because it’s not a true “l” or “r” sound. Saying it as a native English speaker is just downright awkward)

Pig: “ggool ggool” (think a hard “g” sound)

Dog: “mong mong” (dogs so don’t sound like that, RIGHT?!)

Cat: “ya-ohng ya-ohng” (“oh” sound there)

Cow: “um-may um-may” (huh?)

Sheep: “mayyyyyyyy” (not too far off from the American version)

Horse: “hee-hing hee-hing”

And then, to make my point more understandable for you, dear Reader, I recorded us making all the sounds.

 

Notice how adorable all of them are. I’m sad that I no longer have a single one of them in class anymore. They’ve moved on to bigger and better things (or just a higher level, but whatever).

I think the difference in horse sounds was their favorite; we often say “neigh” for horses in the Americas, which literally translated here (Korean spelling is 네) would be an agreement. So horses in America must be very agreeable… Or so I’ve come to assume.

This is just one of the many things I’ve noticed that are remarkably different in Korea. Many things I’ve come to accept as “normal” and it wasn’t until coming home to the Americas this year that I remembered that they’re, well, not the norm to Americans.

More on that later.

But anyway, enjoy the adorable children and the strange sounds their animals make. Happy Friday, Reader. And an even happier weekend to you!

 

2 Comments

    • I agree! It made me realize how ridiculous our sounds are, too, because frogs don’t actually sounds anything like “ribbit ribbit.” But “mong mong” and “ggool ggool”?! Um, no.

      As always, thanks for reading, Dan!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: